Tuesday, July 25, 2017

We have New Age White again!

“Tincho”
The most exciting summer wines to come from Argentina are making quite a splash in the U.S. this year. New Age White (an effervescent blend of citrus-y Sauvignon Blanc and fruity Malvasia) and New Age Rose’ ( also effervescent with Argentina’s signature Malbec red grape and Merlot) add a distinctive Argentine touch when combined with various fruit juices for a South American Mimosa, Cosmopolitan or even New Age Sangria.
Yet, the most common way to enjoy New Age is on the rocks with a twist of lime or lemon. This highly refreshing drink is called the “Tincho” after the cocktails creator.

In Argentina, New Age is usually ordered by the bottle for a group of friends to enjoy. The well-chilled New Age White or Rose’ is brought to the table in an ice bucket, along with traditional “rocks” glasses filled with ice and sliced limes or lemons. The friends share the bottle and camaraderie together at the table. Common practice at traditional “happy hour watering holes” and night clubs in Argentina, this practice is catching on in the United States. (In the Mix)


Tincho - my summer drink!  ~  Jan

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Summer whites - Torrontes

Summer favorite - Crios with lime over ice.


Torrontes is a crisp white wine, produced almost exclusively in Argentina. Typically, the bouquet of a Torrontes wine will be aromatic, showing floral notes, often with citrus characteristics. The palate is crisp, ranging in body from light to medium, and is considered to be high in acidity. Citrus and floral characteristics will translate to the palate, though the citrus is not as prominent as say, a Sauvignon Blanc. As with any wine, the bouquet and palate, or scent and taste,  will be different depending on where it is produced, how it is fermented, and how it is aged.  Torrontes wines are meant to be drank young, and are not typically purchased to age. Torrontes is said to be the signature white wine from Argentina. It pairs nicely with seafood, cheeses, Mexican food, Thai food, and chicken.
It’s not known how Torrontes arrived in Argentina, or how long ago. Once thought to be native to Argentina, there is a bit of speculation where the grape originated. Citations on Wikipedia state “the Torrontes grape has been recently linked, genetically, to the Malvasian grapes, which originates in the Eastern Mediterranean. It is speculated to have come from Spain, perhaps by missionaries”.  However, torrontes genetic profiling done in 2003 links it to Muscat of Alexandria, which originated in North Africa,and Criolla chica, or the Mission grape.  While I find it fascinating that the origin of the grape can not be nailed down, and the debate ranges in writings by many wine geeks, I think I’ll instead pop a cork, or unscrew a top, and tell you a little about the wines from first  hand experience.
Speaking of first hand experience, have you had a Torrontes recently? Or ever? If so, let me know what you had, and what you thought of it! Where did it come from, and would you recommend it to others?
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